Arts News http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events Monash Arts Site Thu, 23 Mar 2017 23:21:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.3 Cheap print: new book about pocket-sized popular music anthologies from the nineteenth century http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/cheap-print-new-book-about-pocket-sized-popular-music-anthologies-from-the-nineteenth-century/ ]]> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 22:00:09 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=16076
Dr Paul Watt (Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music) and Dr Patrick Spedding (LLCL)—with Professor … Continue reading Cheap print: new book about pocket-sized popular music anthologies from the nineteenth century ]]>


Dr Paul Watt
(Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music) and Dr Patrick Spedding (LLCL)—with Professor Derek B. Scott (University of Leeds)—are the editors of a new book published today by Cambridge University Press.

Cheap Print and Popular Song in the Nineteenth Century: A Cultural History of the Songster is a study of pocket-sized anthologies of song texts, usually without musical notation.

Called songsters these anthologies were published in the thousands—sometimes tens of thousands—but few have survived into the twenty-first century.

This book examines the musical, social, commercial and aesthetic functions songsters served and the processes by which they were produced and disseminated, the repertory they included, and the singers, printers and entrepreneurs that both inspired their manufacture and facilitated their consumption.

Taking an international perspective, chapters focus on songsters from Australia, Britain, Ireland and North America and the varied public and private contexts in which they were used and exploited in oral and print cultures.

‘Putting this book together has been exciting not only for us as the editors, but also for our contributors. We have looked in far-flung places for these rare artefacts and to bring their histories to life has been fantastic. Learning about the composers, performers, printers and audiences for these songsters has been a revelation,’ said Dr PaulWatt.

Cheap Print and Popular Song in the Nineteenth Century is the second book published as part of the Monash–Leeds Research Partnership in Music. In 2011, Dr Paul and Dr Spedding co-edited Bawdy Songbooks of the Romantic Period, which was published to wide critical acclaim.

Dr Spedding comments: ‘We have been very lucky to have had the chance to, first, recover a large collection of lost nineteenth-century songsters and, then, to have been able to facilitate the publication of path-breaking new research on the significance of songsters in general. A lot remains to be done, but we are now closer than ever to understanding the scope of popular song in the nineteenth-century.’

Other books arising from the Monash–Leeds partnership include the Oxford Handbook of Music and Intellectual Culture in the Nineteenth Century (edited by Paul Watt, Sarah Collins and Michael Allis) and The Symphonic Poem in Britain, 1850–1940: Texts and Contexts (edited by Michael Allis and Paul Watt).

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Apply now: Hong Kong field school http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/mfj/global-journalism-hong-kong-field-school/ ]]> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:30:19 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=16160
The exciting new unit, Global Journalism: Hong Kong field school, enables students to travel to the Asian media capital to explore why this world city is the big draw for news companies from around the globe.]]>

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Speaking the language of us http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/mits-laura-blackmore/ ]]> Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:35:36 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=16112
In 18 months, about 60 people from 30 different nationalities who speak 40 languages in … Continue reading Speaking the language of us ]]>

In 18 months, about 60 people from 30 different nationalities who speak 40 languages in total have been profiled on Multilinguals of Melbourne, an online photojournalism project on Melbournians started by Master of Interpreting and Translation student Laura Blackmore.

It’s a page where Melbourne’s cultural diversity comes into play but perhaps more importantly, highlights the often overlooked but significant role language, translation and interpreting plays in acute life-and-death matters and more broadly, equity and social justice. Disney also recently recognised Laura’s vision and featured her story in their ‘Dream Big Princess’ campaign.

We spoke with Laura about how Multilinguals of Melbourne got going, what she’s learnt from her study at Monash so far, and what she’s planning to do next.

Laura Blackmore
Film still of Disney video on Laura Blackmore

How did the idea for ‘Multilinguals of Melbourne’ come about?

I can’t pinpoint exactly how, but it was one of the many nights up in my dorm at Monash when I was thinking of Humans of New York [photography project turned photojournalism series with two best-selling books], and then I thought of starting Multilinguals of Melbourne.

I always wanted to create something to show my friends and family back home who I was meeting, as I’m not from Melbourne originally – I’m from Jervis Bay in NSW (two hours south of Sydney). 

It started with my roomies first: Clara from Germany, Nive from India, and Clarisse from Taiwan. Through that I started interviewing people in my course, and then some organisations stated sending me messages. Meltomo [an online platform where Melbourne and Japan connect] from Melbourne messaged me, and we did a big group interview, then some organisations from different parts of Australia including a language bookshop in Perth, and then an overseas Language School in Texas contacted me.

Clarisse was one of the first people featured on Mom and also my roommate at the time. She is an international student from Taiwan and was studying her master's at Monash
Clarisse was one of the first people featured on Mom and also my roommate at the time. She is an international student from Taiwan and was studying her master’s at Monash
Nivedita was the first person featured on MoM and was also studying her master's at Monash. She is an international student from India.
Nivedita was the first person featured on MoM and was also studying her master’s at Monash. She is an international student from India.
Clara (left), Nivedita and Clarisse were my roommates when I came up with the idea of MoM and they were all a huge inspiration for starting the blog
Clara (left), Nivedita and Clarisse were my roommates when I came up with the idea of MoM and they were all a huge inspiration for starting the blog

Why did you choose Monash?

I had a friend who also applied to do the Master of Interpreting and Translation, and had heard great things about it, and the course also has the NAATI approval. I also looked up the campus, and campus life looked great as well.

Living on campus at Clayton was great: we had Sunday afternoon mingles, we had a big event for Diwali the Indian festival of Lights, we had a fair, we had sports – just a great community to come back to.

I was so new to Melbourne it was so nice to have people around me on campus. And I was a ten minute walk to classes so couldn’t complain.

Shankar was featured on MoM and was an international student from India who was studying his undergraduate degree at Monash
Shankar was featured on MoM and was an international student from India who was studying his undergraduate degree at Monash
L-R: Clarisse, Nivedita & myself after the very first photoshoot for MoM
L-R: Clarisse, Nivedita & myself after the very first photoshoot for MoM

How was your experience with the Master of Translation and Interpreting course?

With the master’s, I found it quite a bit more challenging than I thought it would be, just because my level of Spanish wasn’t as great as it could have been.

But I still really enjoyed the course I still really enjoyed the challenge, I really enjoyed being with different people as well.

We had core subjects on the theory of translation and practical-based tutorials, where we actually had to translate from Spanish to English with a wide range of people.

We also got to hear about some language-oriented PhD studies. I got to sit in on one where my tutor presented her project: a book, on a famous Mexican author. That was really interesting for me because I had travelled there.

The team who started Meltomo, who are an Australian/Japanese organisation who promote cross-cultural interactions including all things culture, fashion and language and were all featured on MoM
The team who started Meltomo, who are an Australian/Japanese organisation who promote cross-cultural interactions including all things culture, fashion and language and were all featured on MoM

My eyes were really opened with this course, I didn’t realise how hard it would be to translate cultural norms, like pop culture for instance.

People don’t value the profession of translation and interpreting because they don’t know how hard it is. I mean, I can translate something but someone else can come in and translate it quite differently depending how much they know about the culture.

They often say, choose a country to specialise in as there’s so much within that country – politics, law, travelling, tourism – so much that you want to be the best in a particular culture.

Arden, Joslyn and Nathan are from the ACYA VIC BLC (Australia Chinese Youth Association Victoria Bilingual Language Competition) and were all featured on MoM
Arden, Joslyn and Nathan are from the ACYA VIC BLC (Australia Chinese Youth Association Victoria Bilingual Language Competition) and were all featured on MoM

And for me, it’s also about the skills you learn from learning a language. In school, we learn about the ‘three Rs’ – reading, writing, and arithmetic – but these can be learnt from learning another language too. 

The skills you learn from learning another language are applicable to other areas of study and it just opens your eyes to other people who are out there.

Stevi is the most recent person to be featured on MoM and was an international student at Monash
Stevi is the most recent person to be featured on MoM and was an international student at Monash

It also gives you a certain amount of empathy – you know they’re also trying when you meet someone here and they can’t speak English. People don’t generally want to stand out that way. It’s compassion from other people. Being a good human.

Recently, you were a Disney Language and Culture Ambassador, can you tell us a bit about that?

I’d come back from Mexico last year and thought I’d give ‘Multilinguals of Melbourne’ a really good go.

Then about a month later Disney asked if I wanted to be part of the ‘Dream Big Princess’ campaign which was about girls having their own dreams, interests and hobbies, and so I got to be interviewed for that in July last year and it was released in September.

They wanted to change the narrative for girl power and change the face of who they are, like with the Frozen movie. I was in it with two other girls, a cake maker and a boxer who’s going to the Australian Commonwealth Games, hopefully. I felt really empowered that I got to be a part of it.

What did this involve, what was your story for Disney?

I guess by trade I’m a journalist and language lover, and creating ‘Multilinguals of Melbourne’ when I moved to Melbourne was a way for me to make friends too.

I also love connecting people, people say to me, ‘hey, I’m going to South America in a year, how can I learn Spanish?’

And it’s also for 14 year old me. If I had seen something like this when I was 14, I’d think, oh people actually use languages!Film still of Disney video on Laura Blackmore (click the image to view the video)

Where do you envision ‘Multilinguals of Melbourne’ going?

I would love to be able to go and do ‘Multilinguals in Melbourne’ in different parts of Australia and the world – I know that’s a huge goal.

Maybe make mini documentaries capturing Australia for what it is, not just those in languages. I want to keep interviewing people and meeting people at the grassroots level. Maybe collaborate with a print magazine too; I’m putting the feelers out there. I have big dreams, but I guess it’s about what people want too.

On that, I don’t really feel like there’s a company that’s producing these stories – I feel like language gets left off the music and cultural scene in reporting and magazines.

I know languages can feel dry but I think it’s an uncharted area and I want to explore it more. I also feel like I owe it to the people who have been featured on ‘Multilinguals of Melbourne’ and to continue to facilitate connection through our shared passion for language and cultural diversity.

All photos courtesy of Laura Blackmore.

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Zareh Ghazarian delivers Senate Occasional Lecture http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/zareh-ghazarian-delivers-senate-occasional-lecture/ ]]> Mon, 20 Mar 2017 05:01:29 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=16104
Dr Zareh Ghazarian, Lecturer in Politics and International Relations from the School of Social Sciences, … Continue reading Zareh Ghazarian delivers Senate Occasional Lecture ]]>

Dr Zareh Ghazarian delivered the Senate Occasional Lecture in Parliament House

Dr Zareh Ghazarian, Lecturer in Politics and International Relations from the School of Social Sciences, delivered the Senate Occasional Lecture in Parliament House, Canberra on 17 March, 2017.

The lecture marked the 40th anniversary of the election of the Australian Democrats to the national parliament. It drew on Dr Ghazarian’s research on minor parties as well as findings from his most recent book, The Making of a Party System: Minor Parties in the Australian Senate.

The lecture considered the rise of minor parties in the Australian Senate, especially since the 1980s, and constructed a novel framework for analysis.

As Dr Ghazarian explained, “minor parties winning Senate contests in recent years are advancing a specific policy agenda with links to broad social movements, whereas earlier minor parties arose as a result of fragmentation in a major party with the view to be either watchdogs on, or frustrate, the major parties”.

The lecture also highlighted how the Australian Democrats revitalised the role of the Senate in Australian politics and government.

A recording of the lecture can be found on the Australian Parliament House website.

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Monash journalism staff & graduates win three Quills http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/mfj/monash-journalism-staff-and-graduates-win-three-quills/ ]]> Mon, 20 Mar 2017 03:47:28 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=16101
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Curtailing unemployment and division in Istanbul with International Studies http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/spi-shannonkay/ ]]> Mon, 20 Mar 2017 02:57:50 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=15904
International Studies student Shannon Kay is currently working first-hand in Istanbul, Turkey, which as of February … Continue reading Curtailing unemployment and division in Istanbul with International Studies ]]>

International Studies student Shannon Kay is currently working first-hand in Istanbul, Turkey, which as of February 2017 is host to more refugees than any other country in the world. This includes almost 3 million registered Syrians, with over 500,000 refugees trying to re-establish themselves in Istanbul, a city with a population of over 15 million.

Through a Monash Arts international internship placement, Shannon became co-director of Small Projects Istanbul (SPI) that mostly serves the Arabic speaking community displaced from Syria, Iraq, Palestine and Yemen, through offering educational, social and livelihood support to families and children rebuilding their lives in Istanbul. We crossed to her for a live update. 

Small Projects Instanbul

Firstly, what brought you to SPI?

I am currently completing my final year of an Arts (Global) degree, majoring in International Studies, and focusing on anthropology, political science and history, with a specific interest in the Middle East. Through the support of Monash University, I was able to complete an international internship placement over January to April last year with SPI as part of my degree. It brought a new level of academic focus and direction to my work.

What is your role at SPI?

I have been volunteering as a co-director here since July 2015, during this time the SPI community and education centre has rapidly expanded and now runs a busy weekly schedule for a growing community of beneficiaries. We have also sponsored the enrolment of over 50 primary and high school students from Syria to return to formal education at local Arabic and Turkish schools.

Can you give us a snapshot of the scope of work you’re involved in?

Yes the SPI program has:

  • 20+ programs running throughout the week;
  • 60+ children participating in weekly education and social integration activities as a pathway into formal education;
  • 100+ women working in a handicraft collective established through SPI as a means to generate income and create social connections;
  • 20+ children between 0-4 participating in early childhood development activities while their mothers are working in our handicraft program; and
  • 30+ young professional Syrians having made social connections, extending their networks and finding employment through contacts at SPI.

And, we have just launched a new campaign!

Impressive. How has this work impacted on you and your perspectives?

Through my studies and work I have developed a deep belief and passion for the need for transformative change in our current world systems. I am attempting to enact these beliefs in my daily activities with SPI and in my life in general. This is not the kind of work that can be achieved in isolation, and I have been fortunate enough to meet and work alongside countless others who share my vision.

Personally I find this work both challenging and energising, and feel very privileged to have the opportunity to work so closely with a community of individuals whom I find extremely inspiring in their attitudes and wisdom throughout the hardships of their daily realities. 

What advice would you give to current students?

I believe that individuals can make a difference, and grass-roots efforts like SPI do change lives. I challenge you to commit to one small change in your life. Be brave, see the power of your actions and inspire those around you.

Study with Monash Arts
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Testing times: new research project looks at expectations in healthcare testing http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/testing-times-new-research-project-looks-at-expectations-in-healthcare-testing/ ]]> Sun, 19 Mar 2017 22:55:14 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=16066
Australians have high expectations of tests in healthcare. But are they higher than warranted? And … Continue reading Testing times: new research project looks at expectations in healthcare testing ]]>

Australians have high expectations of tests in healthcare. But are they higher than warranted? And are they impacting on healthcare expenditure?

Importantly, what role do particular socio-cultural factors play in producing and sustaining expectations that may be higher than warranted by scientific evidence?

How do different healthcare contexts shape the meanings attributed to tests—their perceived applications, value and risks?

These are some of the questions underpinning a new ARC-funded project that will be the first sociological study in Australia of expectations in healthcare testing. It aims to understand the sociocultural processes underpinning optimism for the use of testing technologies in healthcare.

Focussing on the Australian national cancer screening programs and routine testing in clinical practice, the project will explore the mechanisms by which optimistic expectations of healthcare testing emerge and function among different stakeholder communities.

Insights from this study will ultimately help to inform the development of policies and strategies that ensure a cost-effective use of healthcare resources.

Find out more about the ‘Expectations in healthcare testing’ study at the newly launched project website.

Research at Monash

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Outstanding Young Alumni Award 2017: Monash Arts alumnus Fahd Pahdepie http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/outstanding-young-alumni-award-2017-monash-arts-alumnus-fahd-pahdepie/ ]]> Sun, 19 Mar 2017 03:27:58 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=15997
Monash Master of International Relations alumnus, Fahd Pahdepie, has won the 2017 Outstanding Young Alumni Award. Supported … Continue reading Outstanding Young Alumni Award 2017: Monash Arts alumnus Fahd Pahdepie ]]>

Fahd Pahdepie receives 2017 Outstanding Young Alumni Award at the Alumni Annual Gala Dinner, Jakarta on the 18th March, 2017

Monash Master of International Relations alumnus, Fahd Pahdepie, has won the 2017 Outstanding Young Alumni Award. Supported by the Australian Embassy in Jakarta, the award is part of the 2017 Alumni Awards which recognize and showcase the significant contribution made by Australian Alumni in their professional fields.

Fahd is an author and social entrepreneur who developed inspirasi.co, an online platform for aspiring writers, videographers, photographers and graphic designers to showcase their projects and build networks. Fahd explained that inspirasi.co is an open platform which invites creative people from multiple disciplines to spread the idea of diversity and tolerance.

“Imagine if they can create writing, designs, illustrations, videos, or music that campaign for diversity and create a counter-narrative to terrorism? That will be something!” said Fahd.

Since it’s launch in January 2016, the site has reached more than 46,000 members, and over 74,000 works have been uploaded. One project example was a competition run by inspirasi.co in collaboration with ‘Yayasan Indonesia Tanpa Diskriminasi’ (Indonesia Without Discrimination Foundation) and  ‘Aliansi Nasional untuk Bhinneka Tunggal Ika‘ (National Alliance for Indonesian Ethnic and Religious Diversity), calling for essays, posters, and videos to promote tolerance and diversity. Thousands of works were submitted during the competition, and Fahd sees many of those works as having the potential to change people’s hearts and minds.

“I believe that creative industries can be used to prevent youth from being lured into extremism. I do it with my writings in social media and also my books. If I can soften people’s hearts with my works, videos or music that’s what I will do, to build a counter-narrative to extremism. I am pretty sure that if we want to be successful in de-radicalisation, we must invest more in the creative industries,” said Fahd.

Monash Master of International Relations alumnus, Fahd Pahdepie

Fahd said that he has always been interested in entrepreneurship, but that it was his Monash master’s degree that really got him on the path to where he is today. He said he found the course “was an eye opener.”

Talking about the impact that Monash academics and their research had had on his own interests and career development, he said, “I remember a paper in Dr. Gu‘s class about ‘Social Media as the New Battleground in Indonesian Politics’, and that was the trigger for me to set up Digitroops Indonesia, an agency that provides strategic social media services for government institutions, politicians, political parties and companies.” 

“I also remember that Associate Professor Pete Lentini’s lectures gave me ideas that in order to fight extremism and terrorism, we could use art, community development, and also the creative industries, and so that is what I did after I graduated from Monash,” he added.

So what is next for Fahd Pahdepie?

“I want to make a movie. So far, I think the movie is the highest achievement in creative work. I believe that I can spread more messages and reach more audiences with movies. I want to inspire as many people as I can, and that is what inspires and motivates me to do the best in my life,” said Fahd.

So watch this space, we’re sure we’ll hear more from this dynamic Monash graduate in the future, and we congratulate him for his well deserved award. 

Fahd’s award was presented to him along with other recipients of the 2017 Alumni Awards at a prestigious Alumni Annual Gala Dinner in Jakarta on the 18th March, 2017.

Study at Monash

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What leading editors look for in student journalists http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/mfj/what-leading-editors-look-for-in-student-journalists/ ]]> Thu, 16 Mar 2017 02:01:07 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=16090
Colleen Murrell, a senior lecturer in the journalism department at Monash University, spent part of January and February this year interviewing media editors in Sydney, London and Paris about the coverage of terrorism. At the end of her hour-long audio interviews, she filmed some short answers to questions such as – ‘what skills or characteristics do you look for in student journalists?’ Check out these responses from editors at publications such as The Times, the ABC, Le Monde, and The Huffington Post.]]>

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Nathalie Nguyen’s ‘South Vietnamese Soldiers’ launched at ADFA http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/nathalie-nguyens-south-vietnamese-soldiers-launched-at-adfa/ ]]> Wed, 15 Mar 2017 03:10:51 +0000 http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/news-events/?p=16001
Associate Professor Nathalie Nguyen, Director of the Monash National Centre for Australian Studies, had her book … Continue reading Nathalie Nguyen’s ‘South Vietnamese Soldiers’ launched at ADFA ]]>

Professor Peter Stanley (left), Associate Professor Nathalie Nguyen, and Dr Tom Richardson (right).

Associate Professor Nathalie Nguyen, Director of the Monash National Centre for Australian Studies, had her book South Vietnamese Soldiers: Memories of the Vietnam War and After launched at the Australian Defence Force Academy UNSW, Canberra, on 7 March 2017, by Professor Peter Stanley.

Associate Professor Nathalie Nguyen (author) at book launch. Photos courtesy of the Australian Centre for the Study of Armed Conflict and Society, UNSW Canberra at the Australian Defence Force Academy.

“Nathalie’s South Vietnamese Soldiers is a powerful book, telling a story that has been neglected if not suppressed … Nathalie rescues these men and women from that black hole, and in the most accessible and immediate way … I found her account profoundly moving,” said Professor Stanley (noting also that he was standing in for the late Professor Jeffrey Grey).

“She shows, I think, that a nation now substantially of migrants must now acknowledge and embrace the histories of Australia’s many constituent ethnic groups as part of its history … These conflicts, like the memories Nathalie has recorded and interpreted, are now part of our nation’s memory of war,” added Professor Stanley.

Associate Professor Nguyen gave a presentation, and was then in conversation with Dr Tom Richardson, who is currently working on Professor Craig Stocking’s Official History project. Questions from the audience followed.

Hosted by the Australian Centre for the Study of Armed Conflict and Society, the event was attended by nearly sixty people and represented a very good mix of veterans and cadets, members of the Vietnamese community in Canberra, scholars and academics, members of the general public, and librarians.

Book launch of South Vietnamese Soldiers: Memories of the Vietnam War and After

The National Library of Australia was a partner organisation for Associate Professor Nguyen’s ARC Future Fellowship project on Vietnamese veterans, and was well represented at the launch.

A key outcome of Associate Professor Nguyen’s project was the creation and establishment of a new oral history archive entitled “The Vietnamese Veterans in Australia Oral History Project” at the National Library. These oral histories will be preserved in perpetuity and available to the public and future historians.

Photos courtesy of the Australian Centre for the Study of Armed Conflict and Society, UNSW Canberra at the Australian Defence Force Academy.

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